At all times, people sought to decorate their homes with various figures and statues, even in the period of caves and mammoths. The first figurines were made of clay, wood and bones, then they were diversified with metal. In prehistoric times, figures of gods and spirits, as attributes of religion, prevailed, but no less dear and lovely decorations were used to decorate life.

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History of porcelain figurines. Figurines from this material were a sign of luxury and prestige, an indicator of status. Far from everyone could afford to buy porcelain figurines, but the grace of forms and refinement in the manufacture attracted the looks to them, and lovers of the beautiful could not deny themselves this interior decoration. Figurines from this material were a sign of luxury and prestige, an indicator of status. Far from everyone could afford to buy porcelain figurines, but the grace of forms and refinement in the manufacture attracted the looks to them, and lovers of the beautiful could not deny themselves this interior decoration. The history of porcelain figurines Due to its aesthetic properties, the quality of porcelain, figurines came to the attention of collectors. A variety of themes, colorful painting, the dynamics of the figures made them a favorite collectibles. Due to its aesthetic properties, the quality of porcelain, the figurines came to the attention of collectors. A variety of themes, colorful painting, the dynamics of the figures made them a favorite collectibles..

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Porcelain mass was invented in Germany by chance, as is commonly believed. The faience known from the 16th century and spread throughout Europe in the 17th century could not be compared with Chinese porcelain objects. They were incredibly elegant, beautiful, light, very rare and incredibly expensive. It was clear that the manufacture of porcelain will make the one who first discover the secret of the magic composition. In European countries, experiments were conducted in this direction, both by potters and alchemists. In Meissen (Saxony), along with other alchemical experiments, Johann Friedrich Böthger (1682–1719) and his teacher, Count Walter von Thirnhaus (1651–1708), experimented with the ceramic mass under the auspices of the King of Poland and elector of Saxony Augustus the Strong. Prior to that, the alchemists worked on improving the composition of the mass, developing glazes and paints for the faience factory in Dresden. In the process of experiments, they obtained in Meusen dark-red ceramics, plastic, of excellent qualities, from which things were made with decorations of baroque motifs or copies of silver and gold products. The result of further experiments was the invention in January 1710 of solid porcelain paste, that is, real porcelain. At the same time, the first porcelain factory in Europe was established in Meusen.